Page 14 - Salem Magazine Spring 2011
P. 14

 Your Salem
   Salem Education Foundation President Jim Tobey (below) presented the Teacher of the year awards
“I think my personality started to come out much more and I began to develop the confidence I needed,” she says. “My dad’s personality was very strong and we couldn’t go into Kroger without him being bombarded by people wanting to talk to him. He taught me a lot about how to treat people.”
Shupe graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from Roanoke College in 1993. Her husband, Bob, whom she first met when both were 15-year-old students at Andrew Lewis, works for the college. Their daughter, Stephanie, a Salem high school and Virginia Tech engineering graduate, now works and resides in Texas.
“I try to look at each child individually, and even if they are acting up or not doing their best work I always try to remember that this is somebody’s child and someone loves this young person,” she says. “I work hard on molding behaviors and getting them to be successful.”
“Mrs. Shupe demonstrates daily that by touching a child’s heart, letting them know you genuinely care for each and every student, that they will aspire to achieve and accomplish great things,” says Seibert.
“She loves teaching, she loves kids and it shows,” says Andrew Lewis principal Jerry Campbell. “She wants them to be successful and she will not let them fail.”
Shupe was chosen from a list of nominees representing each of Salem’s six schools. All six teachers were honored by the School Board at a special reception on March 22. The Teachers of the Year representing the other five Salem schools are: - MS
   Donna Wright
G.W. Carver Elementary
Linda Hall
South Salem Elementary
Fred Campbell
Salem High School
Patrice Sanders
West Salem Elementary
Lynda Pinello
East Salem Elementary
  GOOD FOR ONE (1) FREE RESERVED OR BEST AVAILABLE SEAT TICKET. THIS COUPON MUST BE REDEEMED AT SALEM RED SOX BOX OR FRONT OFFICE. SEATING SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. NO CASH VALUE. NO EXCHANGES. EXPIRES 8/28/11.
it or not, the daughter of Roanoke Valley radio legend “King Edward” Smith IV was very shy growing up.
“With two younger siblings I wasn’t sure my parents could afford college and, honestly, I was afraid of being rejected, so I never sent in an application,” she says. “I didn’t start college until I was 28-years-old and I didn’t graduate until I was 32 because I was afraid Virginia Tech wouldn’t want me,” she says.
So, instead she got married at the age of 20, had a daughter seven years later and established life on the home front before beginning her unorthodox, yet successful journey to the classroom as a student at Roanoke College.
14 Salem Magazine Spring Issue 2011












































































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