Page 47 - Salem Magazine Spring 2014
P. 47

 Water Report
    89. HAA5 [Haloacetic acids]
   N
  15.7-34.8
 ppm
   n/a
  60
  By-product of drinking water chlorination
  90. Toluene
   N
  < 0.5
 ppm
   1
  1
  Discharge from petroleum factories
  91. Vinyl Chloride
   N
  < 0.2
 ppb
   0
  2
 Leaching from PVC piping; discharge from plastics factories
   92. Xylenes
    N
   < 0.5
  ppb
    1000
   1000
  Discharge from petroleum factories; discharge from chemical factories
   Total Organic Carbon
  93. Total Organic Carbon
  N
   0.66-1.26
  ppm
  n/a
   Treatment Technique
(see note #93)
   Naturally present in the environment
            Lead and Copper Analysis ( Most recent monitoring period 2013)*
 Contaminant
 Unit of Measurement
 MCLG
  MCL
  Level Found
 Action Level Exceeded
 Samples > AL
  Typical Source of Contamination
  Copper
  ppm
  1.3
   AL= 1.3
   0.087
  No
  0
  Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives
    Lead
 ppb
   0
  AL=15
  7.7
 No
   0
  Analysis frequency is every three years; thirty samples are collected from the distribution system
Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development. Children could show
slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The City of Salem Water Department is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap 15 to 30 seconds or until it becomes cold or reaches a steady temperature before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your tested. Information on lead in drinking, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov./safewater/lead.
Testing water in the City of Salem water lab.
 www.salemva.gov | SPRING 2014
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